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Author Topic: Crow - it's not just for breakfast any more!  (Read 644 times)

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Offline Deerslayer

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Crow - it's not just for breakfast any more!
« on: May 26, 2015, 05:48:51 AM »
For those of you who have not heard of "crow braking", here is a little something from a fellow who makes very nice and informative short videos.

Crow  or Crow Braking uses Flaps in conjunction with Spoilerons, normally coupled to Elevator, for glidepath and landing control. This is commonly used for model sailplanes. It requires separate Aileron and Flap surfaces and associated multiple servos - one for each Aileron and either 1 for each Flap, or just 1 to operate both Flaps.

The technique is quite applicable to airplanes as well as to sailplanes. Don't be afraid to try it. If someone in the Club wants to see how it works, or to set it up on their aircraft, I would be happy to assist you.

 This video demonstrates the concept, as applied to a Fun Cub:
http://tinyurl.com/m3ypzoy

« Last Edit: May 26, 2015, 05:54:41 AM by Deerslayer »
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Offline Deerslayer

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Re: Crow - it's not just for breakfast any more!
« Reply #1 on: November 29, 2016, 11:51:31 AM »
Here is a close-up example of how Crow is used on a large 3D aircraft. As l described above, when he enables the appropriate Flight Mode(s) the lower portion of the Throttle stick is introducing and varying the amount of Crow. As well, the Flaps and Ailerons are still completely operative, responding as full span Ailerons to the stick. 3D work is typically done at extremely low Throttle settings, and constantly being worked, not a lot above a fast idle up to perhaps 1/3 Throttle or so. As soon as you start to power out of a manoeuver, the Crow will be reduced and completely eliminated by the time you get to, say, 1/4 Throttle.
This aircraft also has an iGyro setup which has been carefully tuned to match the range of expected flight conditions. There was strong, gusting wind on this day but you would not notice it too much. The gyro takes care of a lot of the disturbances, allowing the pilot to concentrate on precise and difficult flying.
 
This video clip was shot by Colin Geisel with his iPhone up at the 400 Club near Barrie as the "Eastern Mafia" was hucking up the last great flying day of this Fall. Nice work, Colin (and Dan)!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kDAQ9hwt3Es&app=desktop
« Last Edit: November 30, 2016, 06:10:36 AM by Deerslayer »
My purpose in Life is to serve as a Warning to others