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Author Topic: Injury Prevention and Management  (Read 1603 times)

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Offline Deerslayer

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Injury Prevention and Management
« on: January 22, 2013, 08:32:16 AM »
A recent incident prompts me to produce this document, which has been presented and discussed at the January Meeting.

Claude Melbourne, our Zone Director and MAAC Vice-President was in attendance and reinforced a couple of key points in here: Do Not Fly Alone  and Do Not Wander Out in the Bush Alone. He offered some specific examples showing the potential consequences.

There are a lot of hazards in our little part of the world, but we should be able to avoid most these or at least deal effectively with an injury situation.

One observation, related to this recent injury:

Having a First Aid kit is of great value - provided it has some basic items and someone who knows how to employ them. I would rather know that there is a bottle of clean (unfrozen!) water and a roll of gauze bandage than a full suite of surgical supplies in there! The former might be useful to someone like me, either as the victim or as the First Aider; the latter would just be confusing and mostly useless to most of us.

I think that we should look at the kit in the clubhouse and reduce it to basic, well-supplied items. For example, there are a bunch of cold packs and all kinds of other mysterious items. Yet,we did not find scissors, and there was only 1 small roll of gauze bandage when we needed it badly. I finally "got around to" replacing this a few days later (poor priority setting on my part). I added a couple of extra bandage kits plus a tube of Polysporin (my personal favorite miracle cure!).

So, please read the following Attachment. Offer any criticisms, upgrades, etc. Reg has volunteered to simplify and condense these, suitable for posting in the clubhouse:
My purpose in Life is to serve as a Warning to others

Offline Flypaper 2

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Re: Injury Prevention and Management
« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2013, 11:40:09 AM »
Just to add.It was my own negligence that caused this. Who better to add to the safety aspects for my punishment :(
  Some of my own lessons learned the hard way. Playing with one of my first electric helis on the workbench. Went into the programmng and hit the wrong servo reverse switch, and you guessed it.It was the throttle!! went up past, just missing my nose, hit the ceiling, went across to the wall and disintegrated itself and fell to the floor in parts and pieces. When playing with helis, take the main blades off or unplug the motor when programming. This goes even more so with the planes. Fix it in your mind when you hit that programming button, to take the prop off or unplug the motor without fail.. Another point, when binding your electric plane, make sure you put the throttle trim to the bottom. If you don't and you accidently shut the trans off by mistake, the motor will go to fast idle, where the trimmer is telling it to go. A plane went off the bench a while ago because of this, but just as well as it was pointing at a guys belly button :o Broke the motor off the front of the plane. This isn't necessary for the glow or gas planes, as you may want it to stay idling when it goes into failsafe, so that it's still running if and when it turns back on and you have power to land.
 We have fairly shallow ground at the field so make sure your tiedown stake is in far enough, at least a foot into the ground. Otherwise tie it to one of the posts on the benches to the right side. The bigger 1/4 scale planes should be tied to the rings in cement over in front of the cookshack, That's what they're for. When starting keep everything away from the front of the prop. If your trans is sitting there and the stake comes loose, goodby radio. :-[ Don't let anyone stand in line with your prop blades when starting. In front of or behind is fine. If I think of more, I'll add.
 If putting this up and it helps someone from having the same thing happen, my sore finger is worth it.
Gord
Hotglue, held together with foam.

Offline shaggy

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Re: Injury Prevention and Management
« Reply #2 on: March 18, 2013, 07:51:47 AM »
It's well know that myself and any kind of power tool or equipment don't tend to get along.
If I'm working with tools there is always blood.  Luckily I have managed to keep it to a minimum.
With that in mind, recent events, and a few personal close calls I have forsaken the screwdriver and rope tie down. :)

After looking around and doing some research I think I may have found a very safe starting solution.

http://www.airopult.com/en/

I purchased one of these last month it it came in a few weeks ago.
I will bring it to tonights meeting if anyone wants to take a closer look.

 

Offline shaggy

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Re: Injury Prevention and Management
« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2013, 01:25:35 PM »
Here a picture with me Cap 232 being restrained.
Plane can't roll forwards or backwards.
Even running the engine (DA50) at full throttle she wont move 

« Last Edit: August 10, 2013, 05:27:35 PM by shaggy »

Offline Deerslayer

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Re: Injury Prevention and Management
« Reply #4 on: April 14, 2016, 08:41:05 AM »
Restraining aircraft is not just for starting!

How many time have you seen someone leave a model, particularly a foamie, sitting on a bench or table outside and then get blown off, possibly getting damaged? Or, worse yet, damaging someone else's property!

If you do have to leave a plane on a table, consider lying it upside down. That way, it is less likely to take off or blow off.

Another thing that many are unaware of is the sudden, severe gust caused by a thermal kicking off, usually from the parking lot. Just yesterday, as I was taking my glider back to the truck, THREE of my aircraft which were on the ground - 2 foamies and a 40-size balsa were suddenly picked up, lifted over our vehicles and flown around the parking lot about 20 feet in the air, then plunked down upside down. Only minor damage to the 2 foamies, none to the bigger plane. The neighbouring Fun Cub was carried around a bit on the ground. It was all I could do to hold onto my glider for a few seconds, on the tailgate, until things settled down. No damage was done to any vehicle.

This has happened many times. a couple years ago, a large beach umbrella took off, flailed around in the air and broke my windshield. IF that thing had hit someone, there would have been blood!

PLEASE, think about this and take some precautions.

Incidentally, someone remarked that they thought you would only get this kind of thing on a hot summer day. Incorrect! Yesterday was a cool day, light wind, but the low level atmosphere was moderately unstable. When the parking lot warmed the air, a thermal formed, reached the trigger temperature and a "bubble" or "column" of air suddenly rose. Surrounding air rushed in to take its place, its speed increased by flowing between the vehicles. That's how it happens, folks!   

I have seen full sized sailplanes, weighing upwards of 600 lbs, easily lifted from the ground by this - usually because they were not properly restrained and without having their dive brakes locked open.
« Last Edit: April 14, 2016, 01:59:35 PM by Deerslayer »
My purpose in Life is to serve as a Warning to others

Offline Penguie

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Re: Injury Prevention and Management
« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2016, 06:26:12 PM »
i do not know how our kit is stocked but I did come across this online:

http://www.costco.ca/St-John-Ambulance-Deluxe-Sports-First-Aid-Kit.product.100162356.html

gives an idea of a sports stocked kit (has scissors!) and non adhering gauze for wounds as well

Offline Deerslayer

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Re: Injury Prevention and Management - Throttle Cut
« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2016, 07:39:16 AM »
It is surprising that some flyers still do not have a proper Throttle Cut enabled for each of their models. For the newer radios in common use at our field, predominately Spektrum, it is simple to do.

Decide which common switch you plan to use for ALL of your models.


Electrics:
Set the Throttle Cut value to -100%. Spektrum has a default of -130%, but this is a very bad idea for electrics. Why? Some ESC's "auto-learn" the Throttle channel endpoints. They are not very consistent across brands; if your ESC "learns" -130% as the new zero point, as soon as you disengage the Throttle Cut, the motor may start! This has happened to me and to countless others that I know of. While you are at it, go into the appropriate Servo setup menu and disable the Trim (set = 0) for Throttle. That will ensure that you haven't left the throttle Trim advanced and then release the Throttle Cut, resulting in starting the motor.

Glow and Gas:
 Set things up such that activating Throttle Cut will drive the channel to your kill point. The -130% may be OK, with Trim enabled. With our IC engines, we tend to use Throttle Trim at least on some occasions, so you may want to leave its sensitivity at the default (setting = 5?) or somewhat less.

If someone wants help with this, PLEASE ask one of the Instructors or experienced pilots. This is a serious issue and everyone is responsible to ensure that injuries do not occur due to misunderstood technology or lack of attention.
« Last Edit: July 09, 2016, 08:45:37 AM by Deerslayer »
My purpose in Life is to serve as a Warning to others